Untitled


fyeahwomenartists:

Gego (Gertrud Goldschmidt)Drawing without Paper 84/25 and 84/26, 1984 and 1987Enamel on wood and stainless steel wire
(via MoMA | The Collection | Gego (Gertrud Goldschmidt). Drawing without Paper 84/25 and 84/26. 1984 and 1987)

fyeahwomenartists:

Gego (Gertrud Goldschmidt)
Drawing without Paper 84/25 and 84/26, 1984 and 1987
Enamel on wood and stainless steel wire

(via MoMA | The Collection | Gego (Gertrud Goldschmidt). Drawing without Paper 84/25 and 84/26. 1984 and 1987)

(via fyeahwomenartists)

— 1 year ago with 18 notes
fyeahwomenartists:

Gego (Gertrud Goldschmidt)Sphere, 1959Welded brass and steel, painted 
(via MoMA | The Collection | Gego (Gertrud Goldschmidt). Sphere. 1959)

fyeahwomenartists:

Gego (Gertrud Goldschmidt)
Sphere, 1959
Welded brass and steel, painted 

(via MoMA | The Collection | Gego (Gertrud Goldschmidt). Sphere. 1959)

(via fyeahwomenartists)

— 1 year ago with 66 notes

writeonwhite:

Gego (Gertrud Goldschmidt)

Venezuelan architect, sculptor, draughtsman and printmaker of German birth. She studied architecture at the Technische Hochschule in Stuttgart until 1938; one of her principal teachers was Paul Bonatz. The following year she travelled to Venezuela, where she combined her artistic career as a sculptor, draughtsman and engraver with teaching work. In 1952 she adopted Venezuelan nationality. She later began experimenting with the conversion of planes into three-dimensional forms, exploring the media of drawing, watercolour, engraving, collage and sculpture and integrating them into architectural spaces in defiance of artistic conventions. A pioneering example of her integration of art and architecture was her design (1962) for the headquarters of the Banco Industrial de Venezuela in Caracas, which comprised a 10-m tower of interlocking aluminium and steel tubes. Later works that explored the form of the web included Trunk No. 6 (wire, 1976; artists col., see exh. cat., p. 114). She participated in numerous one-woman and group shows in Venezuela and other countries, and in 1980 she was awarded the Premio Nacional de Artes Plásticas in Venezuela. She executed over 850 sculptures, 600 drawings and 60 engravings during her career.

MoMA

— 1 year ago with 27 notes
ann symes: Drawing the unknown →

annsymes:

Taking from the drawer

a large sheet of thick, white paper,

I place it on the floor

and kneel before it.

With a big stick of charcoal

I begin to make marks;

rhythmic, gestural, hard, soft,

intuitively covering the paper

until my hand takes over.

I work slowly with feeling,

drawing deeper

— 1 year ago with 8 notes

likeafieldmouse:

Cui Fei - Manuscript of Nature V (2007)

(Source: likeafieldmouse, via annsymes)

— 1 year ago with 3932 notes
"Do not let the behavior of others destroy your inner peace"
Dalai Lama   (via vinnana)

(Source: healingfeeling, via annsymes)

— 1 year ago with 28817 notes
sirilaf:

Michel François - Walk Through a Line of Neon Lights

sirilaf:

Michel François - Walk Through a Line of Neon Lights

— 1 year ago with 6912 notes

museumuesum:

Michel François

Déjà Vu (Hallu), 2002

Video Projection

— 1 year ago with 47 notes
cavetocanvas:

Robert Motherwell, Iberia No. II, 1958
From the Tate Gallery:

Iberia No. 2 is a large, predominantly black and ochre canvas with three distinct layers of paint. The first is a thin layer of yellow ochre followed by a thin and then a thicker layer of black. It is one of a series of works of the same title which Motherwell made during the summer of 1958, when he and his third wife, the artist Helen Frankenthaler, were on honeymoon in St. Jean de Luz, a small fishing town on the French coast near the border with the Basque country. The two artists spent several months that summer working in France and Spain and it was a particularly productive time for MotherweLL.

cavetocanvas:

Robert Motherwell, Iberia No. II, 1958

From the Tate Gallery:

Iberia No. 2 is a large, predominantly black and ochre canvas with three distinct layers of paint. The first is a thin layer of yellow ochre followed by a thin and then a thicker layer of black. It is one of a series of works of the same title which Motherwell made during the summer of 1958, when he and his third wife, the artist Helen Frankenthaler, were on honeymoon in St. Jean de Luz, a small fishing town on the French coast near the border with the Basque country. The two artists spent several months that summer working in France and Spain and it was a particularly productive time for MotherweLL.

— 1 year ago with 137 notes

museumuesum:

Jenny Holzer

The Living Series, 1980-1982

cast bronze plaques, variable dimensions

— 1 year ago with 308 notes

workman:

mydarkenedeyes:

Beili Liu - 237 Minutes

“I positioned a piece of burning charcoal on a stack of wax paper. The exchange and transformation between the heat and the material is recorded on each layer of paper. The process is visually documented by the subtle transition of large, dramatic burnt holes circled with shards of black ash, to faded yellow circles. The process took 237 minutes.”

(via annsymes)

— 1 year ago with 2057 notes

cavetocanvas:

Tara Donovan, Untitled, 2011. Mylar and hot glue.

— 1 year ago with 560 notes